Cora and Uncas: A Love Story

November 19, 2009


We’ve all watched The Last of the Mohicans, and we all think that the chemistry lies between Hawkeye and Cora and Uncas and Alice. Well, that’s just not true. In Hollywood, they have the liberty to rearrange the movie to suit their purpose, and to attract the audience. 


But if you’ve ever read the book you will find out that Hollywood’s take on this wonderful story is very different and almost unrecognizable to the original work of James Fennimore Cooper.


The love story, as I like to call it, doesn’t evolve around the romantic Hawkeye and Cora Munro, nor does it focus on Uncas and Alice. The romance between these two set of couples do not exist in the book! 


However, there is a twist that most of us movie watchers will never know by just watching the movie. There is a love that most of us wouldn’t even recognize if it stared us in the face—that’s just how subtle it is.


The romance that is presented in the book happens to be between Uncas and Cora Munro. Their love is quite and pure, but as the reader, you feel the power and fidelity of their quiet romance. It is strong! 


In the movie we see Uncas as one of the last of his tribe, a protective, loyal, strong and determined Mohican Indian. In the book, Uncas’s character changes more than any other character over the course of the novel; Uncas grows in his skill and develops a natural ability to lead, he also falls in love with the beautiful Cora Munro (a raven-haired, strong-willed woman with African roots), and is devoted to protecting her and even fighting for her to the very end.


The interracial love of Uncas and Cora ends in tragedy. In the end Cora Munro dies from a knife to the heart. This act of injustice drives Uncas to acts of vengeance; he ultimately dies trying to avenge the loss of Cora. 


It’s inspiring to think that Uncas loved Cora enough to lay down his own life to avenge her, even if it was a foolish thing to do. But that’s what makes the book romantic—it’s not the wild and feverish romance of Cora and Hawkeye—but a subtle, passionate love between two people from two very different worlds.

5 comments

  1. Wonderful post and very true!

    I love this movie... and I mean love, but I also adored the differences in the book.
    Uncas is a real man and Cora is one of my role models.

    This was a well-though-out post and your observations were sharp. I agree with you totally.

    Even though I do not comment often, I enjoy reading your blog. =D

    Blessings,
    Cassie

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  2. I've never heard of the book or movie..until now that is! That was a really good review though, now I have a good idea of what the book is like :)
    Thanks for commenting on my blog, I always enjoy reading your thoughts!
    LocaChica

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  3. Hello, just found your blog. I was looking for pics of the Last of the Mochicans. I am in the middle of the book (but I skipped ahead and read the death of Uncas) and I completely agree that it's perfect in the book. I love the subtle-ness of it. My favorite part so far has been when Uncas doesn't want to leave them at the waterfall and Cora tell him that he has to go, but he looks at her in is reluctant. If that isn't romantic...they kind ruined that scene in the movie for me. They romance was kinda..."wow, sudden much". I'm glad I'm not the only one who likes the book!

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  4. Agreed! I love the movie but I hate how it wrecked one of my all-time favourite books!

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  5. I also agree. I think the death of Uncas is the saddest moment in American literature and although I enjoyed the movie very much, (the music and Wes Studi and so much more,) my feeling, as I was leaving the theater was relief at not having to watch Uncas die. I mean, he died in the movie but by putting the spotlight on Hawkeye and Cora, the death of Uncas became something less, for which and maybe for one night only, I was grateful.

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